God is omni...?

Discussion in 'Open View Theology' started by Deadmanwalking, Jun 13, 2017.

  1. Deadmanwalking New Member
    Deadmanwalking

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    Can someone provide me irrefutable scripture that says God is omni...everything?

    Currently, that's what I believe, but I'm wondering if scripture even supports that view or if I've just been taught based on the ideas of others.
     
  2. Mungo Member
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    I think it is inherent in the definition of God.
     
  3. Anthony D'Arienzo is a Verified MemberAnthony D'Arienzo Moderator
    Anthony D'Arienzo

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    Here you go...enjoy;
    http://www.preceptaustin.org/notes_for_attributes_of_god_ii#omniscient
    Omniscience is from the Latin omnis = “all” combined with scientia = “knowledge” the combination meaning to know all or to have perfect knowledge.

    God’s omniscience is His knowledge of all things including actual and possible, past, present, and future (foreknowledge).

    God is all knowing, and His knowledge is in no way restricted by temporal considerations. He knows and sees the past, the present, and the future with equal clarity and absolute certainty. To Him, all is the present.

    God knows all things perfectly (Ps. 147:5; Job 37:16; 1 John 3:20), sees and hears everything (Ex 3:7; 2Chr 16:9; Ps 34:15; 102:19, 20; Pr 5:21; 15:3; Jer. 16:16), knows from all eternity the entire plan of the ages and the part of every man in that plan (Isa. 46:9, 10, 11; 48:3, 4, 5, 6, 7; Acts 15:18; Eph. 1:3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12).

    God has perfect knowledge of each individual person and of all his ways (Ps. 33:13, 14, 15; 139:1-16; Pr. 5:21), his words (Ps. 139:4; Matt. 12:35, 36, 37), his thoughts (1Chr 28:9; Ps. 94:11; 139:1, 2; Mt. 9:4), his afflictions and trials (Ge 21:17, 18, 19; 1Cor. 10:13; Rev. 2:9, 10, 13) and his future actions and final state (Gen. 18:19; Ex. 3:19; Isa. 44:28-45:5; Matt. 25:31, 32, 33, 34, 41; Acts 27:22, 23, 24, 25).

    God’s omniscience means that nothing anyone does escapes the knowledge of God and that one day we will be called to give an account at the bar of God for God will deal with each according to the truth of his life (Ro 2:2, 3, 6; 14:10, 11, 12). For more information on the various judgments, see The Doctrine of the Judgments.

    God's omniscience gives us confidence in prayer knowing that He will not lose our prayers and that He always knows the best answer, even knowing our needs before we ask (Matt. 6:31, 32, 33, 34; Isa. 65:24).




    http://www.preceptaustin.org/the_attributes_of_god_by_a__w__pink
     
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  4. Anthony D'Arienzo is a Verified MemberAnthony D'Arienzo Moderator
    Anthony D'Arienzo

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    (Play Handel's Messiah - The Hallelujah Chorus)

    OMNIPOTENCE (Ps 68:14; 91:1, 2; 115:3; 2Cor 6:18) means God is all powerful and thus has unlimited authority & influence. He has the ability to do whatever His will dictates. Man may have the authority but not the ability to carry through. The term omnipotence is not found in Scripture but clearly is declared in Scripture (Ge 18:14; Job 42:2; Nu 11:23; Mt 19:26; Rev 1:8; 4:8; 11:17; 19:6). His omnipotence is seen in His act of creating (Ge 1:1, 2, 3; Ps 33:6, 7, 8, 9). and sustaining everything (Col 1:17b; Heb 1:3), in His relation to mankind (Gen. 45:4, 5, 6, 7, 8; Ex. 4:11; Da 4:17, 25, 32; Luke 12:20; Acts 12:21, 22, 23, 24), in His relation to the hosts of heaven (Da 4:35; Heb 1:14), in His power over Satan and his minions (Job 1:12; 2:6; Luke 22:31, 32), and as Commander in chief (Ex 9:3, 4, 5, 6, 23, 24, 25, 26, 33; Ps. 107:25, 26, 27, 28, 29; Jonah 1:17; 4:6, 7, 8; Da 3:22,23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28).

    Jesus said “All authority (exousia = authority and power to act - see word study) has been given to Me in heaven and on earth.” (Mt 28:18)

    Although God has all power He cannot do that which contradicts His holy character or essence and thus He cannot annihilate Himself because He is eternal, immutable, and all wise. He cannot lie because He is truth (Titus 1:2; Heb 6:18). He cannot not keep His Word because He is faithful (2Ti 2:13). God cannot be tempted by evil (James 1:13). The omnipotence of God gives every saint a firm foundation to trust Him and confidence in His ability to keep the precious and magnificent promises in Scripture.
     
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  5. Anthony D'Arienzo is a Verified MemberAnthony D'Arienzo Moderator
    Anthony D'Arienzo

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    To make matters easy to understand, let's list four categories of scripture that lead us to the doctrine of omnipotence:



    A. Nothing is too hard for God.

    "Ah, Sovereign LORD, you have made the heavens and the earth by your great power and outstretched arm. Nothing is too hard for you." Jeremiah 32:17

    "For nothing is impossible with God." Luke 1:37

    B. No one can stop God's plans.

    "I know that you can do all things; no plan of yours can be thwarted." Job 42:2

    C. He made all things and all things serve him.

    "Your laws endure to this day, for all things serve you." Psalm 119:91

    D. He does whatever he pleases.

    "Our God is in heaven; he does whatever pleases him." Psalm 115:3

    Seven Stages of God's Power

    In his commentary on Ephesians (God's New Society, pp. 139-140), John Stott shares a delightful analysis of Paul's famous benediction at the end of Ephesians 3:

    Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen. (Ephesians 3:20, 21)

    I am going to retrace his comments, with one or two slight changes. Let's call this the Seven Stages of God's Power.



    1. He is able, for he is the true and living God..

    2. He is able to do, for he is neither inactive, idle, nor dead.

    3. He is able to do what we ask, for he hears and answers prayer.

    4. He is able to do what we ask or imagine, for he reads our thoughts, and sometimes we imagine things for which we do not dare to ask. But he can do those things anyway.



    5. He is able to do all that we ask or imagine, for he knows it all and can perform it all.



    6. He is able to do more than all we ask or imagine, because his expectations are higher than ours.



    7. He is able to do immeasurably more than we ask or imagine, because his power is unlimited.



    As a simple summary statement we may say that there are no limits to what God can do because there are no limits to GOD.



    Among the many titles given to God in the Old Testament is one that relates directly to his omnipotence. InGenesis 17:1 God speaks to 99 year old Abraham who has been promised a child by God. By this time his body is "as good as dead" (see Romans 4:19, 20, 21, 22). In the face of all his very understandable doubts God reassures him by calling himself EL Shaddai, which means Almighty God (See study). It was God's way of saying, "Don't look in the mirror, Abraham. Look at me. If I say you're going to have a son, it's going to happen. Age means nothing to me. I am Almighty God." (For the full sermon message see Is Anything Too Hard For God? The Doctrine of God's Omnipotence by Ray Pritchard)
     
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  6. Joe is a Verified MemberJoe Administrator
    Joe

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    If no one can stop God's plan, why does God's plan changed in the old testament a hand full of times based on a humans prayer?

    Why does God express "regret" after creating humans during the time of the flood?
    If He knew, regret is an illogical way to describe emotion for God..
     
  7. Anthony D'Arienzo is a Verified MemberAnthony D'Arienzo Moderator
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    God speaks to us in language we can understand. He has no need to change at all as he knows all. The term used for such language is anthropromorhism;
    [1] Biblical anthropomorphism is when human characteristics are projected on God.

    The Bible has examples of God referring to himself in anthropomorphic terms and the biblical writers referring to God in anthropomorphic terms -- the purpose being to describe God in terms more understandable to humans. Without anthropomorphism, since God is invisible and immaterial, we would not have a framework on which to understand Him.

    Contents
    Anthropomorphism in the Bible
    Examples of anthropomorphism can be seen in the following passages:

    Exodus 3:20 "So I will stretch out My hand and strike Egypt with all My miracles which I shall do in the midst of it; and after that he will let you go.

    Exodus 32:14 So the LORD changed His mind about the harm which He said He would do to His people.

    Isaiah 38:1-5 In those days Hezekiah became mortally ill. And Isaiah the prophet the son of Amoz came to him and said to him, "Thus says the LORD, 'Set your house in order, for you shall die and not live.'" Then Hezekiah turned his face to the wall and prayed to the LORD, and said, "Remember now, O LORD, I beseech You, how I have walked before You in truth and with a whole heart, and have done what is good in Your sight." And Hezekiah wept bitterly. Then the word of the LORD came to Isaiah, saying, "Go and say to Hezekiah, 'Thus says the LORD, the God of your father David, "I have heard your prayer, I have seen your tears; behold, I will add fifteen years to your life.

    The danger of incorrectly interpreting anthropomorphic verses
    Many theologies have arisen out of literally interpreting anthropomorphic verses in the Bible; once such notable theology is Open Theism. This theology takes verses where God seemingly changes His mind ( Numbers 16:20–35), and grieves ( Genesis 6:5–6) to be literal statements.

    Audius and his followers, the Audians, were a sect of Christians that arose in the fourth century in Syria and extended into Scythia. They took the text of Genesis 1:27 literally, saying that God has a human form. The error was so gross, and, to useJerome's expression (Epist. vi, Ad Pammachium), so absolutely senseless, that it showed no vitality. [2]

    http://www.theopedia.com/anthropomorphism
     
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  8. Joe is a Verified MemberJoe Administrator
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    Anthropomorphism is one opinion, and that's all it is.
    It's a useless argument when you're speaking with someone who would prefer to take the sets of verses at face value rather than speaking philosophically into them to keep their specific theological view in tact.
     
  9. Anthony D'Arienzo is a Verified MemberAnthony D'Arienzo Moderator
    Anthony D'Arienzo

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    So if what you say is true...when the bible says God has body parts....and it also says God is Spirit....how do you answer to keep your view intact. Keep in mind that in Phil2; it says Jesus had to take upon himself a body....he did not have one...he took it on.

    Also, explain how a perfect all knowing God needs to repent?
     
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